July 16, 2012

New Site for Ole Miss Neuroscience!

This site has been moved to:

http://neuroscience.olemiss.edu/

Any questions about Ole Miss Neuroscience then just holler at the admins!

June 6, 2012

Root of self-control?

A study conducted by a University of Iowa neuroscientist,  William Hedgcock, suggests that diminished activity in the dorsolateral prefronal cortex (DLPFC) could be the reason for a loss of self control.

Click here to find out more at Neuroscience News.

June 2, 2012

Obituary: Sir Andrew Huxley

Sir Andrew Huxley, who was awarded the Nobel Prize along with Sir Alan Hodgkin for figuring out the mechanism behind nerve impulses, has died. Read his obituary in the Guardian here.

May 29, 2012

Mysterious sensory organ found in whale’s chin

A sensory organ has been found in whales’ chins. It has been suggested that this sensor provides the whale with information about the position of its tremendous jaw when hunting for food.

Click for the NPR article.

May 29, 2012

J. B. Johnston Club for Evolutionary Neuroscientists

J. B. Johnston Club for Evolutionary Neuroscientists

Upcoming Meeting Oct 11 & 12 New Orleans, LA
Abstract deadline changed to June 4th (was May 25th)

http://jbjclub.ning.com/

May 27, 2012

Online Electronic Textbook

This is a fantastic free online textbook covering a vast amount of neuroscience topics; there are some pretty cool videos embedded in the text as visual aids to the concepts covered.

The project is headed up by Dr. John Byrne at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and is intended as an online study aid.

May 23, 2012

SFN 2012

*Abstract submissions have now closed, but click for more information on this year’s SFN meeting.

May 19, 2012

J. B. Johnston Club for Evolutionary Neuroscientists

J. B. Johnston Club for Evolutionary Neuroscientists

Upcoming Meeting Oct 11 & 12 New Orleans, LA
Abstract Deadline May 25

http://jbjclub.ning.com/

May 15, 2012

Fun Fact (Well, theory at least)

Neurons evolved from amoeba-like cells. Amoeba are protists that are known to produce pseudopodia, which are protrusions from the cell body that allow the cell a degree of motility. The theory goes that these protrusions, which involve the internal restructuring of microtubules, at some point became permanent, resembling dendrites and axons that are today characteristic of neurons. For more information, see Antonio Damasio’s Self Comes to Mind (Vintage, 2010).

See the pseudopodia of the amoeba on the left, and the pyramidal neurons on the right.

May 3, 2012

Day Lab Meeting 05/05/2012

Meeting in the Day Lab @3

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